Elder Scrolls Online

BelgarathMTH

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[Dúathil extends a "dinner invitation" to the human with a menacing smile]

Hey, you're lucky we Bosmer are considered to be the only elves with a sense of humor!

Jokes aside, even if my parents were apostates, let me shed some light on your prejudice:

When the Mer first came to Tamriel, my Bosmer siblings were the ones who ventured forth and made their home in the lush and impenetrable jungle of the Valenwood. The forest god Y'ffre assumed patronage of my ancestors and gave them the permission and abilities to thrive in this otherwise hostile environment in return for the oath known as the Green Pact.
My people lost their shape-shifting abilities and can't take, eat, kill or otherwise consume and harm any vegetation of the Valenwood, as it's the sacred dominion of Y'ffre the Forest God.
Greenspeakers can form and grow architecture from living trees without harming them. Otherwise, shelter, tools, weapons, music instruments etc are made from bones and hides and the like, and skulls are a popular decoration. My people are hunters, especially skilled archers, and use every little piece of the killed animals.

To never kill wastefully and never let anything to rot is part of of the Green Pact and the main reason for what you call "cannibalism". The Bosmer of the Valenwood honour their own dead by consuming their flesh, and that of their fallen enemies. They don't hunt people of sentient races for sport or as a delicacy. But think a bit, with all the alliances and wars you're talking about: Would they have happened if you valued every kill enough to consume the whole flesh of your opponent?

With that said, I don't know everything. I'm an orphan and my parents were apostates who had left the Valenwood to live in the Great Forest in Cyrodiil, because my mother loved alchemy and my father loved her. I only know what they told me until I lost them, and what I've read in books.

Besides, the Green Pact only applies to the vegetation of the Valenwood. The use of imported wood for example is allowed, and many Bosmer who live in other parts of Tamriel, where any vegetation can be used, don't even follow the Meat Mandate any longer. If they do, they will only eat your flesh after they have killed you for a good reason. Never fear, they won't lure you to their camp to bind you to a cooking spit ;).
I had a feeling I was getting my impressions of the Bosmer from biased sources, since I've not played through their zones or in their alliance in ESO. Thanks for setting me straight, with good-humored roleplay to boot. :)
 

shmity72

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stay daggerfall covenant. they are the wholesome sort also, it's one of the better story lines of the three alliances in my humble opinion.

your alliance matters. in pvp.

when you eventually go to cyrodiil (don't sweat having to do pvp), you will only be able to attend with the alliance/faction you're associated with

so yes make most all your toons daggerfall i would suggest.
after you finish with the daggerfall line my suggestion is either: summerset/wrothgar/morrowind chapters next. also summerset opens up a skill line rather quickly called the 'psijic' line. also in the skyrim dlc the reach i think? you may aquire the skill line 'antiquities' that may be something you wish to look into as well.

also in black reach (if having a companion fight with you and grow with you is your bag) you may attain one there. that's a google thing for you to find out about though

happy tamriel adventures. i'm excited for you to see my eso movie ;)
 

BelgarathMTH

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How has it been going for you in Tamriel, @BelgarathMTH? 🪄
Hi, I'm still playing and learning. I settled on being a healer, and I have leveled both a warden healer and a templar healer. I can't decide still which I like better, but I've been focusing on my templar the past couple of weeks. I even got into doing some four person dungeons, after I found out the normal level ones are very easy and very light on mechanics you have to know.

My warden is an Aldmeri Dominion Altmer, and I ran into a couple of storylines in the Grahtwood that started turning me off to that culture, especially when I saw the Bosmer execute a Khajit merchant for selling a cut alchemical reagent that had been used to cure a Bosmer woman of a fatal disease by her husband.

Well, it wasn't so much the Bosmer as their enraged forest spirits. It seems they live in fear, because any violation of the Green Pact makes the whole forest start attacking them and demanding the blood of whoever violated it. The quest made me get involved in helping them hunt down the guilty parties, and I kind of hated them for that, especially since I didn't know they planned to execute the perpetrator.

My templar is a Daggerfall Covenant Breton, and so far the values and lore reflected in the quests are more in line with what I want to roleplay, so that's an incentive for me to stick with that character.

I really love the beautiful locales and the lore of the world, so I still would like to give Morrowind-Oblivion-Skyrim a try after I finally get tired of ESO. I've got quite a lot left to explore in ESO before I finally get around to it, though.
 

Antimatter

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TESO has a ton of content. I would easily see how you spend another 100-200 hours in it before even thinking about something else. Enjoy your stay there! The locales of the world, the music, the lore, and even some quests and stories they tell are all similar to what you can find in a SinglePlayer game.
 

BelgarathMTH

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So here's a screenshot of an Elder Scrolls Online locale that I found particularly striking. Maybe I should try posting more of these. I keep "planning ahead" thinking I'll get tired of ESO and want to move on the single player Elder Scrolls games, but there's *so* much content here. I'm still in the base game, no more than two maps into each of three factions that have four or five maps each, and if I ever finish one on one character, he'll have the option to continue on and do the other faction's maps, and that's just the base game. It's a mind-bogglingly huge amount of content in this amazing game.

EDIT: Steam says I have 684 hours into ESO so far, and I've barely scratched the surface of the content. (684 hours? Really? Where did all the time go? How is that even possible? I've been playing maybe four weeks.)

EDIT 2: The more I think about it, that figure can't possibly be accurate. The only explanation I can think of is that Steam has been running its internal "time played" clock ever since the day I first installed the game.

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Urdnot_Wrex

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So here's a screenshot of an Elder Scrolls Online locale that I found particularly striking. Maybe I should try posting more of these. I keep "planning ahead" thinking I'll get tired of ESO and want to move on the single player Elder Scrolls games, but there's *so* much content here. I'm still in the base game, no more than two maps into each of three factions that have four or five maps each, and if I ever finish one on one character, he'll have the option to continue on and do the other faction's maps, and that's just the base game. It's a mind-bogglingly huge amount of content in this amazing game.

EDIT: Steam says I have 684 hours into ESO so far, and I've barely scratched the surface of the content. (684 hours? Really? Where did all the time go? How is that even possible? I've been playing maybe four weeks.)

EDIT 2: The more I think about it, that figure can't possibly be accurate. The only explanation I can think of is that Steam has been running its internal "time played" clock ever since the day I first installed the game.

View attachment 2296

It is possible, if you played for 4 weeks straight, 24/7... so yeah, probably it's not counting the way it does with single player games. But it's cool that you're enjoying it do much. I have never been into MMOs for various reasons, but this might become the exception, some day in the future.
 

BelgarathMTH

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It is possible, if you played for 4 weeks straight, 24/7... so yeah, probably it's not counting the way it does with single player games. But it's cool that you're enjoying it do much. I have never been into MMOs for various reasons, but this might become the exception, some day in the future.
If you like Skyrim, you should like the single player part of ESO, since it's very similar, and very deep in lore. If you're into the Skyrim lore, ESO would be like going back in time 1,000 years or so and learning about Tamriel as it used to be. There's all kinds of fascinating lore and history about the various races and their cultures, as well as the gods. You would see and adventure through many familiar places with slightly more contemporary graphics design behind them.

Everything is voice acted. Every last line of dialogue is spoken. You can even pass people on the street and overhear conversations, and the conversations change over time according to things you've done in the game. They start to hear about you. I think Skyrim may have a similar world-building system that interfaces with the player.

All the MMO elements can be ignored if you know how to sort it. The single player questing part of the game can be soloed easily. You see other players running around the game, but they're only as relevant to you as you want them to be. You can pretend they're all NPC's going about their business if you want to, although they do sometimes steal your kills or resource nodes you might have wanted to harvest.

Crafting is meh. I've found it an absolute waste of my time up to level 35, but I keep doing it for some reason, probably peer pressure, and my own OCD. (They all say, oh, you must do crafting, don't neglect your research and crafting writs, but I've not yet gotten a single good thing out of it, other than maybe some materials extracted I was able to sell for good gold.)

Just between you, me, and the fencepost, (and I suppose everybody else here who is going to read this), I think the whole crafting system in the game is designed to "encourage" you to buy their $15 ESO+ monthly subscription. There are also cosmetic microtransactions meant to monetize the game, and again, you can ignore all of it. There is plenty of content with just the base game.

I don't know how much you know about MMO's, but "dungeons", "trials", and "PvP" can all be completely ignored in this game. The whole MMO ball of wax is optional and skippable.

I've always played World of Warcraft only for the story and quests, ignoring all instanced and multiplayer content, and this game is the same for me, but 100 times better to play for exclusively story and RP.

The only thing that might stand in your way would be the online requirement, as you've said you're often at work or in places where you have time to play but have no gaming internet access. (I know workplaces often block anything gaming related, among other things, as NSFW, and that hospitals often have spotty Wi-Fi.)
 

Antimatter

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I absolutely agree with @BelgarathMTH on this. Now when TES 6 is pushed to 2028+, and I have no guarantee that game would actually be what I dream it should be (after my Starfield impressions), TESO seems the game for those who love TES lore. It's created by a different group of developers, who yet managed to reproduce the look and feel of Tamriel. It's not that all original creators of TES continue to work in BGS, no, they left a long time ago, actually. And with Zenimax, the creators of TESO, it's visible how creative and talented they can be. Every new addon to TESO only makes the game better, adds new interesting mechanics.

I yesterday had an NPC conversation about Redguards and Stros M'Kai pirates in Skyrim. If I didn't play TESO, this dialogue would just be yet another dialogue, but considering I played TESO and actually visited Stros M'Kai and still remember it, I totally got immersed and had some fun memories. That's the power of TESO.
 

shmity72

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i think the steam client accounts for the time the launcher is open as time played as well. i'm glad you're enjoying daggerfall covenant. and yes...you've just scratched the surface of this game. :)
 

Urdnot_Wrex

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2022 was a year where I tried out a lot of new things in games, so I don't suppose it's such a big surprise it was the year where I tried my first MMO.
Which, in fact, wasn't because of the desire to play an MMO, but because even after only 60 hours in Skyrim until now, I have come to love the Elder Scrolls lore, I have heard good things about the single-player-friendly aspects of The Elder Scrolls Online, I have seen such beautiful screenshots, and the social aspect of being able to play together with friends played a huge role in my decision to get this game with all currently available DLCs as a package deal in one of the latest sales.

I would have been curious to try out the game anyway at some point, but the biggest factor was the suggestion to play parts of it together over the holiday period with @Antimatter and @Eternal . It was like a beautiful vacation in Summerset with friends, and my first extended multiplayer experience, an adventure that will forever stay in my memory, and I'll always be grateful for this unique opportunity.

Before the period of some MP sessions, I started to get familiar with the character creation and game lore on my own, figuring out which race and class to play and which region to explore first.
I first gravitated towards the Nightblade class, and either with a Khajit or a Bosmer. But I had played a Bosmer in Skyrim and didn't know much about Khajiti culture, so instead I decided to try something new and play a spellcaster, picking Altmer because I wanted to explore Summerset, with its friendly climate, impressive architecture, beautiful shorelines and blossoming trees.
So here's my Altmer Sorcerer, named Meariil, in the prologue area.


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I played through the prologue using a destruction staff and just getting familiar with the surroundings (everything looks so good!), then travelled to Summerset.

After getting familiar with a few mechanics, getting my first apartment, and seeing how simple combat against easy enemies works, I realized it's not as complicated as I first thought, and that throwing fire or lightning bolts at my opponents wasn't too fulfilling. I also saw how vast the game is and how much room for role-playing it leaves, so I strongly felt the pull to be who I want to be, my original idea, dropped the sorcerer (level 4) and created a Khajit Nightblade instead. A choice I'm still very happy with at level 38, even with slight respecs along the way.

There she is, Felis'nocturnus, exploring Northern Elsweyr (because I started playing on my own there and left Summerset for the MP sessions).

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I don't even really know where to start and where to continue about my experiences, there's just so much.
First of all, a very beautiful aspect of the game is that every person you interact with is fully voiced, and amazingly so! I just love to listen to my fellow Khajit for example, and this one here is a detective, assisting him in an investigation as one of my first quests.

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Meanwhile this hilariously fussy guy is voiced by the great John Cleese:

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And no, that's not a huge house cat I'm sitting next to there, it's a Senche-raht, another form of Khajit, and yes, he's reading a book:


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Senche-raht are used as mounts in battle, but they're people, and that can make for awkward situations :LOL::


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Wouldn't dream of it, sister.

Okay so I'm a Nightblade, which is kind of an assassin/rogue combat type class, and the Khajit racial skill line gives bonus to something I have learned to enjoy greatly in games: Sneaking, stealing and pickpocketing!
And before someone with moral high ground implies dark impulses and sinister motives here, let me introduce the deity I blame for it:

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(Collecting the stolen mural pieces for a house of history is a side quest in Northern Elsweyr).

So while the RL me has fun with the challenge of stealing, the required observation and dexterity, and the thrill of success, the roleplayer is simply worshipping her trickster deity as is totally appropriate.

Fleeing from guards when caught (my stealth wasn't that good yet) needs a bit of practice though, otherwise this can happen. I think Rajhin snickered at the poor amateur I still was.

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Next will be about MP, Summerset and the New Life Festival, but I thought I'd split my impressions into more than one post, because it takes time and space to write everything down and sort through it.
 

Antimatter

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ESO is such a complex game with so many activities, I like it a lot. But I would probably put one factor above others, for me personally--it allows you to actually visit and explore different parts of Tamriel, and when you do that, you learn to know what places are called, who inhabits them, what sightseeing spots are, what the nature is like etc etc.

User u/Bengamey_974 from Reddit created this marvelous map of Tamriel, and thanks to ESO, I can find familiar names and locations everywhere!

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Urdnot_Wrex

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The New Life Festival


As I have mentioned before, I started playing Elder Scrolls Online in December, and from December 15th to January 3rd there was the New Life Festival, an in-game holiday event around the new year.

In a wilderness area of Eastmarch, not far from Windhelm, there was a festival pavilion where players could talk to Breda, the New Life Festival Herald, who explained about the various traditions in different regions of Skyrim and sent players on quests to participate in them.

Antimatter already posted a screenshot about the Breton tradition in another thread but it's so fitting to describe the festival that I have to share it a second time:


Breda_New Life Herald.jpg


So the beautiful thing about those festival quests, especially for a new player like me, is that it gives you a reason to travel to several different regions (sometimes not easy to reach, because in some areas you have to unlock a wayshrine first and travel by foot or boat through neighbouring regions, unless you happen to have higher level friends who have unlocked the wayshrines already and go ahead so that you can teleport to them), see what those areas and their inhabitants look like, how the landscape is, and get a first glimpse of their history and culture. It's a great way to see new places, and the content of this game is huge, so it's a perfect opportunity to form a first impression if it's a region you would like to explore further in the future.

So here I am performing in Alcaire Castle's throne room.

Castle Charm Challenge.jpg



The Dunmer tradition for the New Life Festival is called the Lava Foot Stomp, it's dancing in different inns and in House Hlaalu (one of the five Grest Houses of the Dunmer, as people who have played Morrowind would know).

Lava Foot Stomp.jpg



I would have expected the Dunmer to be too grim for dancing, but I was wrong. Actually Breda even explains where the tradition and the name come from: When the city of Ebonheart declared dancing to be illegal for a time, the Dark Elves invented the Lava Foot Stomp, a safety measure to practice in case their boots should ever catch fire (they do live in a volcanic region after all). They wore a pin to recognize they're safe among friends, but nowadays it's just a symbol of good company.

The very stuffy and dignified Altmer, on the other hand, who I would have expected to be very formal about any festivities, have accepted a rather mischievous tradition introduced by the wood elves.


Breda_Mudballs.jpg


And while it's part of the quest to throw mud balls at other festival participants in Skywatch, and at one of the three marked targets (important diplomats), you can also target the guards. Don't do that. I was warned, but couldn't stop myself, and found myself being chased with a bounty for throwing a mud ball at a Dominion Guard during Mud Ball Merriment, because yes, it is very regulated. Was still worth it, and besides I have gotten much better at escaping guards alive. My class ability to go completely invisible for a few seconds helps a lot.

But I think my favourite festival tradition is the one practiced by the Nords. It's the Snow Bear Plunge, where you have to travel to 3 locations in Skyrim and jump into the icy water. Of course, because they're Nords, warming up with a drink around the campfire is part of the tradition too!

Snow Bear Plunge.jpg



Snow Bear Plunge 1.jpg



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Of course there were more quests, like my fellow Khajit with the Trial of Five-Clawed Guile, a lockpicking challenge to honour Rajhin, or the Redguards with a timed quest to light signal fires in memory of an important battle, the Argonians with a tradition to go fishing and share the food with the ones in need, etc.

What I liked about all those quests was that they celebrated a togetherness of different kinds, something that brings people closer, and while everyone did them on their own, it was nice and fun to see other players doing the same, especially in the dancing and performing.

And of course there's no holiday season without gifts, so whenever you return to Breda with a finished quest, you get a festival box with rewards after every quest, and 3 festival ticket vouchers for the first of those quests completed per day. Those tickets are an in-game currency that can be used to purchase limited items at a special event merchant called an Impresario. Unused tickets remain and can be used during the next festival.


So at the end of this long event I had enough tickets to purchase different parts that merged together gave me this cool mount, an Aurelite Gryphon (or something like that):

Gryphon Mount.jpg


It was a very nice and rewarding experience and especially a beautiful way to introduce a new player to the various regions and cultures in Tamriel, and available to all players who own the game (I don't have an ESO Plus subscription, it's entirely optional and not at all required to play the game).
 

Antimatter

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I just finished the week of a free ESO Plus trial. Essentially, I could visit all the areas and do all the available content in the game (for 7 days, that is). It's been such a great experience visiting places like Fargrave (a neutral Oblivion plane), Deadlands (a plane of Mehrunes Dagon), Anvil (which I still remember from TES 4 Oblivion), and The Reach. I joined both the Thieves Guild and the Dark Brotherhood, and really enjoyed the stories of both of them (at least, the beginning of those stories). I was hesitant to join the DB at first, but then discovered that it's essentially Assassin's Creed, but in the TES lore (gameplay-wise, e.g. sneak kills, quests where you have an objective not to get spotted, etc), and moreover, unlike Astrid's small group in TES 5 Skyrim, this DB is true to its tenets. Hail Sithis!

I managed to find 3 missing leads to components of the mystic ring, the Ring of the Pale Order. Forging this item felt very rewarding, as while wearing it, I heal for 20 percent of the damage I deal to enemies. Thanks to this ring, and some great help from 2 friends I played with (Urdnot_Wrex & Eternal), I managed to finally beat a difficult Group Dungeon.

Now, if only Starfield would have locations like this, providing me with existential feelings & beautiful alien thoughts.

Fargrave1.jpg

Fargrave2.jpg

Fargrave3.jpg

Deadlands.jpg

Deadlands1.jpg

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Cahir

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So, I started to play The Elder Scrolls: Online. I haven't played any MMO ever, so I was very hesitant to try one. But I thought, TESO would be the more friendly to a solo player and here you go.

So far, it's surprisingly good. It's aged a bit visually (especially the first location in Aldmeri Dominion questline), but it doesn't bother me. There are typical MMO mechanics that I need time to get used to (like constant monster respawns and never-ending grinding), but quests and the fully voiced characters make the exploration pleasant so far. I suspect it won't be the game that I will play, let's say 8 hours straight, but definitely it's a great game for 2-3 hours sessions.

So, meet Alkee-Byades (a nod to a certain pretty boy from Assassin's Creed: Odyssey), a khajit sorcerer. I usually play humans in crpgs, so I thought this would be a good opportunity to play something completely different.

Zrzut ekranu (87).png
 

BelgarathMTH

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So, I started to play The Elder Scrolls: Online. I haven't played any MMO ever, so I was very hesitant to try one. But I thought, TESO would be the more friendly to a solo player and here you go.

So far, it's surprisingly good. It's aged a bit visually (especially the first location in Aldmeri Dominion questline), but it doesn't bother me. There are typical MMO mechanics that I need time to get used to (like constant monster respawns and never-ending grinding), but quests and the fully voiced characters make the exploration pleasant so far. I suspect it won't be the game that I will play, let's say 8 hours straight, but definitely it's a great game for 2-3 hours sessions.

So, meet Alkee-Byades (a nod to a certain pretty boy from Assassin's Creed: Odyssey), a khajit sorcerer. I usually play humans in crpgs, so I thought this would be a good opportunity to play something completely different.

View attachment 3494
I'd be very interested in hearing updates about your experiences and impressions. For me, the combat wasn't challenging enough to keep me interested past my initial excitement to explore. I'll still play it from time to time, though, when I'm in the mood for good rp stories with trivial combat.
 
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